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#107 - C8 Spyder

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  • F Spider
    replied
    I guess I should have said: I'm on the cover of Men's Journal, and then show a link.

    Leave a comment:


  • SpykerOwner
    replied
    Originally posted by Mel Bonkers View Post
    Rijk, looks like you own 1 of the 97 perfect things

    .. at least 1

    Leave a comment:


  • Mel Bonkers
    replied
    Rijk, looks like you own 1 of the 97 perfect things

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin Slegg
    replied
    Originally posted by F Spider View Post
    The #107 on the cover of Men's Journal.

    Leave a comment:


  • F Spider
    replied
    The #107 on the cover of Men's Journal.
    Attached Files

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  • F Spider
    replied
    Moderator,

    This thread should be merged with the #007 thread.

    Spyker 007, welcome to the board.

    Leave a comment:


  • Spyker 007
    replied
    Spyker #007 on autogespot.nl

    Spyker #007 is the 3rd Spyker registered in the Netherlands under new ownership.
    Pre-owned by Victor Muller and very beautifull car with a very full company history.

    Spotted and pictures were posted on internet. Can't blame him. It is a beauty. Check the link with pictures here: http://www.autogespot.nl/viewimages....02122007020920

    Put the Spyker cars on the road a let everybody enjoy these marvels.
    Last edited by Spyker 007; 07-12-2007, 13:20.

    Leave a comment:


  • F Spider
    replied
    Hugo,

    Any time......

    Leave a comment:


  • Throttleman
    replied
    Originally posted by Mel Bonkers View Post
    Rijk,

    I'm not sure the US is strong enough to handle a visit from Hugo :lol:. @Hugo, just joking my friend!
    Good catch, Mo! :lol:

    Leave a comment:


  • Throttleman
    replied
    Originally posted by F Spider View Post
    Hugo,

    The Euro is strong, just come to the US.
    I would love, Rijk.
    I'm getting my life in order, so some trips might be possible, probably next year. NY would be fantastic.

    P.S. I love these details... the 4 point seat belts and the propeller steering wheel are a must! Seems like everything is now where it should be. Fantastic!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mel Bonkers
    replied
    Rijk,

    Take good care of Tom. A mechanic who opts for the hard way and leaves the easy way to deliver some top notch work, is rare!

    And as I said earlier: now #107 is complete

    Cheers,

    Mel

    Originally posted by F Spider View Post
    See my post in the "parts" thread

    Tom is just brilliant. Without any instructions, he is able to figure out how to take the steering wheel out. There were no visible screws, bolts or clips, but he methodically took it apart and managed to install the propeller steering wheel. I was standing by for most of the time and only had to assist him when the old steering wheel nut came out, but the steering wheel would not release itself.

    That turned out to be the simple part. To get rid of the standard three point seat belts and to install the four point belts without a manual, was much more daunting. Getting the lower two points nuts off with the seats in place was possible, but the belt buckle and belt did not want to come off. there is just no room to work. Everything is sooooo tight.

    Finally Tom decided to take the seats out: the rails were in the back attached from the inside, but on the front they were attached from the underside of the car. Once the seat could be pushed up, the original belts could be removed and the lower two points could be attached.

    The three point seat belt automated mechanism was located behind the back panels. However, they were bolted in from the engine bay side, and could not be taken out without dismantling all the engine attachments, so that the rear clam shell could go up. I told Tom just to cut the belt and leave the mechanism, but he could not maim a perfectly good mechanism and feel good about it.

    He rolled up the seat belt, rolled it in vinyl to avoid rattling, and tied it back to the mechanism. So, it can still be converted back to a three point seat belt system. To attach the top two point was easy. The car is designed for it, so he just had to cut the holes in the leather. The threads were right under it. He reattached the seat tracks and the rest was easy.

    Now the car looks like it was designed......

    Leave a comment:


  • Mel Bonkers
    replied
    Originally posted by F Spider View Post
    Hugo,

    The Euro is strong, just come to the US.
    Rijk,

    I'm not sure the US is strong enough to handle a visit from Hugo :lol:. @Hugo, just joking my friend!

    Leave a comment:


  • GAS Art
    replied
    Originally posted by F Spider View Post
    See my post in the "parts" thread

    Tom is just brilliant. Without any instructions, he is able to figure out how to take the steering wheel out. There were no visible screws, bolts or clips, but he methodically took it apart and managed to install the propeller steering wheel. I was standing by for most of the time and only had to assist him when the old steering wheel nut came out, but the steering wheel would not release itself.

    That turned out to be the simple part. To get rid of the standard three point seat belts and to install the four point belts without a manual, was much more daunting. Getting the lower two points nuts off with the seats in place was possible, but the belt buckle and belt did not want to come off. there is just no room to work. Everything is sooooo tight.

    Finally Tom decided to take the seats out: the rails were in the back attached from the inside, but on the front they were attached from the underside of the car. Once the seat could be pushed up, the original belts could be removed and the lower two points could be attached.

    The three point seat belt automated mechanism was located behind the back panels. However, they were bolted in from the engine bay side, and could not be taken out without dismantling all the engine attachments, so that the rear clam shell could go up. I told Tom just to cut the belt and leave the mechanism, but he could not maim a perfectly good mechanism and feel good about it.

    He rolled up the seat belt, rolled it in vinyl to avoid rattling, and tied it back to the mechanism. So, it can still be converted back to a three point seat belt system. To attach the top two point was easy. The car is designed for it, so he just had to cut the holes in the leather. The threads were right under it. He reattached the seat tracks and the rest was easy.

    Now the car looks like it was designed......
    Rijk,

    Fabulous Work! That Tom is such a perfectionist. I got a chance to shoot his cars as well, and step into his meticulous garage.

    Your car is an absolute museum piece!

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevin Slegg
    replied
    Originally posted by F Spider View Post
    I can even see the blinker and high beam indicators. With the other steering wheel they were hidden behind it.
    How do you find the chrome dash/steering wheel in bright sunlight. Do you get the sun reflecting into your eyes???

    Leave a comment:


  • F Spider
    replied
    I can even see the blinker and high beam indicators. With the other steering wheel they were hidden behind it.

    Leave a comment:

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